Archive for ‘Nature Notes’

Fantastic Phenomena

Ready for the Night
Movement Makes the Magic Happen!
Stir It Up!

After learning about the nearby fluorescent, bioluminescent waters last year I had to patiently wait for all the right factors to align (warm water, new moon, time off, cooperative weather, and synchronized schedules with friends). Luckily, everything worked out just right last night!

Katie, Lori, Arlene, Al, and I paddled out of the tiny Safety Harbor marina around 9:30pm (roughly an hour after sunset). I was eager with anticipation and it didn’t take long before we were all oohing and aahing over the mesmerizing display.

The light show is courtesy of millions of minute dinoflagellates (Pyrodinium bahamense) which emit a blue light when disturbed. The water was calm, a large ray flitted under us, dolphins swam by, and we were the only paddlers on the water. Though the camera on my phone barely captured the phenomena, it was magical. Thank you phytoplankton (and friends) for lighting up the night!

Night Swimmer

I was a bit surprised to see this snake swim by last night at John’s Pass. Sadly, after much fruitless searching, I still haven’t any idea exactly what it is. It certainly looked like a capable swimmer that knew how to hunt for food. Did you see it bump the algal clump (in the middle of the video), in an attempt to dislodge any hiding prey?

According to my research, there are not any sea snakes native to the Atlantic Ocean (and thereby, the Gulf of Mexico). Though there have been sightings of sea kraits and Yellow-bellied Sea Snakes in the past few years.

One hypothesis suggests that ships are responsible for these new visitors. It is possible that the snakes were suctioned up with ballast water in other tropical waters and then accidentally released here when the weight was no longer needed. There is documentation that other species have been introduced in this manner.

No matter what it is or how it got here, it certainly looked quite at home!

Not Trash!

I’ve been picking up litter ever since I was little, it’s a hard habit to break. After all these years, I have a good eye for spotting trash and other oddities (things that seem out of place).

During the summer months, it’s fairly common to find curved, plastic-like structures on the beach. I will admit that my first summer here I presumed they were some kind of marine debris. Maybe from a fishing vessel? So, into the trash they went.

Last year, I didn’t pick them up. I still didn’t know what they were but I had a feeling that they were some sort of natural phenomenon. I was curious about them (but obviously not enough to take the time to photograph or research them).

A couple months ago, I was delighted to randomly come across an article that explained these strange shapes were not trash but were, in fact, egg casings created by the Shark Eye Moon Snail (Neverita duplicata). I tucked that important information away and waited for summer.

Last week I found my first egg casings (or sand collars) of the season. Each one contains thousands of eggs carefully secreted by the female snail into a protective, gelatinous structure. After a quick photo shoot, I carefully buried them back in the sand.

It takes them about six weeks to hatch so hopefully next month there will thousands of veligers floating in the water!

Consider Me Chuffed!

While strolling the beach earlier this week I chanced upon my first Banded Tulip Snail (Cinctura lilium hunteria) shell. Carefully, I picked it up and turned it over. Most of the time when I find gastropod shells they are still in use by the sea snail. Other times they have been claimed by hermit crabs. In either case, I fling them back into the water so they can go about their lives in the sublittoral zone.

As decorative as it was, I was thrilled that this three inch long shell was devoid of inhabitants. There’s a lot going on with this shell: a thin, brown line spirals around the whorl while mauve and blue-gray streaks contrast against a creamy white background. Talk about eye-catching!

It now has a prominent place among my ever-growing shell collection. Did you know? A shell expert is a conchologist (if you were a researcher working with the live animals you’d be a malacologist).

My, What Big Eyes You Have!

While relaxing in my hammock recently at Fort De Soto Park, I felt someone watching me. Turning carefully around, I encountered this intriguing-looking insect.

Despite the common name of Eastern Eyed Click Beetle (Alaus oculatus), the ovate white rings are not sensory organs. Instead, they are an example of a defensive mechanism designed to thwart predation.

At roughly two inches long this is not a tiny insect and those false eyes certainly make it appear larger. But that’s not all, as a click beetle it can also spring away quickly (which makes a loud clicking sound). I wish I had witnessed this action. Maybe next time!

It Flies! It Walks! It Croaks!

Sea Robin, Treasure Island, Florida June 2022

Meet the Sea Robin aka Gurnard (Prionotus carolinus), a bottom-dwelling fish. The first common name honors their wing-like pectoral fins. These special fins not only help them “fly’ through the water but the three modified fin-rays (visible in the photo above) help them “walk” along the sea floor. The second moniker mimics the croaking sound the fish makes during mating season (or when it is pulled from the water).

The three inch long fish in my photo is a juvenile while adults can reach about 17 inches. Long considered a trash fish or unwanted bycatch, this mild tasting, light, flaky fish is now gaining in popularity in the kitchen. Maybe someday I’ll get to try one.

Upside Down?

Went fishing at Robinson Preserve in Bradenton earlier this week. The fish weren’t playing but we were entertained by some interesting creatures, including this Upside-down Jellyfish (Cassiopea xamachana). It was my first encounter with this species of sea jelly and it was fascinating to watch it “swim”.

As best I can tell, this sea jelly was actually upside down as it pulsated by (or is that right side up). Unlike most sea jellies, this species lives life tentacles up, using their bell to secure them to the sea floor.

Yesterday, I posted my video of a juvenile Horseshoe Crab that swam by upside down, I’m sensing a trend here…

Little Swimmer

Robinson Preserve, Bradenton, Florida June 2022

This was the first time I’ve seen an Atlantic horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) swimming and this little “saucepan” was cruising! This is not the normal way they swim. Not sure how but apparently, this one had been turned over. Or maybe he’s just a unique creature that likes doing things differently.

I do know that being upside down on land can be fatal, there’s even an outreach program in Delaware that asks people to flip them over (complete with a catchy theme song).